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POHAKULOA TRAINING AREA, Hawaii – Marines with Bravo Battery, 1st Battalion, 12th Marine Regiment’s “Black Sheep,” prepare their M777 Lightweight Towed Howitzer for a direct fire training exercise as part of Lava Viper 17.1, a staple in the battalion’s pre-deployment training on Oct. 16, 2016, at Range 13 aboard Pohakuloa Training Area, Hawaii. Lava Viper Provides the Hawaii-based Marines with an opportunity to conduct various movements, live-fire and tactical, integrating combined arms exercises. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jesus Sepulveda Torres) - POHAKULOA TRAINING AREA, Hawaii – Marines with Bravo Battery, 1st Battalion, 12th Marine Regiment’s “Black Sheep,” prepare their M777 Lightweight Towed Howitzer for a direct fire training exercise as part of Lava Viper 17.1, a staple in the battalion’s pre-deployment training on Oct. 16, 2016, at Range 13 aboard Pohakuloa Training Area, Hawaii. Lava Viper Provides the Hawaii-based Marines with an opportunity to conduct various movements, live-fire and tactical, integrating combined arms exercises. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jesus Sepulveda Torres)

MARINE CORPS TRAINING AREA BELLOWS – Lance Cpl. Justin Rumphrey, a team leader with Charlie Company, 1st Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, and a Loganville, Georgia native, patrols through a simulated village during Exercise Island Viper aboard Marine Corps Training Area Bellows, Sept. 29, 2016. Exercise Island Viper is a 3-week-long battalion level training evolution workup that focuses on sharpening the infantry skills of the individual, team and squad. (U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Lance Cpl. Jesus Sepulveda Torres) - MARINE CORPS TRAINING AREA BELLOWS – Lance Cpl. Justin Rumphrey, a team leader with Charlie Company, 1st Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, and a Loganville, Georgia native, patrols through a simulated village during Exercise Island Viper aboard Marine Corps Training Area Bellows, Sept. 29, 2016. Exercise Island Viper is a 3-week-long battalion level training evolution workup that focuses on sharpening the infantry skills of the individual, team and squad. (U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Lance Cpl. Jesus Sepulveda Torres)

KAHUKU TRAINING FACILITY – Lance Cpl. Rick Mercer, a rifleman with Fox Company, 2nd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, and a St. Clair Shores, Michigan, native, loads his M240 Machine Gun for a patrol as part of a training exercise aboard the Kahuku Training Facility, Sept. 20, 2016. The exercise is part of a 7-week-long training event known as the Advance Infantry Course. The Advance Infantry Course, which is conducted by the Advance Infantry Battalion, Detachment Hawaii, is an advanced 0311 (Rifleman) Military Occupational Specialty course for squad leaders who are currently serving in the operating field. Originally only for 3rd Marine Division, the course here has opened up to various infantry units throughout the Marine Corps. Marines start with a week of proofing their prerequisites that are required for the course, confirming their basic skill sets, and then spend two weeks in a garrison environment doing course work and physical training routines geared toward the squad leader. Towards the second half of the course, Marines conduct one live fire week, followed by three consecutive weeks in the field, progressing from an urban exercise to a patrolling exercise, with offensive and defensive tactics. Marines trained in multiple areas on the island, from high in the mountains of the Kahuku Training Facility to the Military Operation in Urban Terrain facilities on Marine Corps Training Area Bellows. (U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Lance Cpl. Jesus Sepulveda Torres) - KAHUKU TRAINING FACILITY – Lance Cpl. Rick Mercer, a rifleman with Fox Company, 2nd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, and a St. Clair Shores, Michigan, native, loads his M240 Machine Gun for a patrol as part of a training exercise aboard the Kahuku Training Facility, Sept. 20, 2016. The exercise is part of a 7-week-long training event known as the Advance Infantry Course. The Advance Infantry Course, which is conducted by the Advance Infantry Battalion, Detachment Hawaii, is an advanced 0311 (Rifleman) Military Occupational Specialty course for squad leaders who are currently serving in the operating field. Originally only for 3rd Marine Division, the course here has opened up to various infantry units throughout the Marine Corps. Marines start with a week of proofing their prerequisites that are required for the course, confirming their basic skill sets, and then spend two weeks in a garrison environment doing course work and physical training routines geared toward the squad leader. Towards the second half of the course, Marines conduct one live fire week, followed by three consecutive weeks in the field, progressing from an urban exercise to a patrolling exercise, with offensive and defensive tactics. Marines trained in multiple areas on the island, from high in the mountains of the Kahuku Training Facility to the Military Operation in Urban Terrain facilities on Marine Corps Training Area Bellows. (U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Lance Cpl. Jesus Sepulveda Torres)

Lance Cpl. Jorge Briseno (left), 19, a wireman with 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, and a San Diego native, and Lance Cpl. Xavier Hall (right), 21, a calibrations noncommissioned officer with 3rd Bn., 3rd Marines, and Shelbyville, Ky., native, pose for a photo holding their birthday cake during training exercise Lava Viper, one of the staples of their pre-deployment training, aboard Pohakuloa Training Area, Hawaii, Oct. 22, 2015. Lava Viper provides the Hawaii-based Marines with an opportunity to conduct various movements, live-fire and tactical training before departing for Integrated Training Exercise aboard Marine Air-Ground Combat Center Twentynine Palms, Calif., where the battalion will train and be evaluated as a whole. "Trinity" strives to fight and win on both the tactical and ethical battlefield, always cultivating the values of honor, courage, and commitment, ultimately producing morally guided citizens whose obligations and responsibilities supersede rights and privileges. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Harley Thomas) - Lance Cpl. Jorge Briseno (left), 19, a wireman with 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, and a San Diego native, and Lance Cpl. Xavier Hall (right), 21, a calibrations noncommissioned officer with 3rd Bn., 3rd Marines, and Shelbyville, Ky., native, pose for a photo holding their birthday cake during training exercise Lava Viper, one of the staples of their pre-deployment training, aboard Pohakuloa Training Area, Hawaii, Oct. 22, 2015. Lava Viper provides the Hawaii-based Marines with an opportunity to conduct various movements, live-fire and tactical training before departing for Integrated Training Exercise aboard Marine Air-Ground Combat Center Twentynine Palms, Calif., where the battalion will train and be evaluated as a whole. "Trinity" strives to fight and win on both the tactical and ethical battlefield, always cultivating the values of honor, courage, and commitment, ultimately producing morally guided citizens whose obligations and responsibilities supersede rights and privileges. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Harley Thomas)

Capt. Penny MacCormack, a supply officer with 3rd Radio Battalion, freezes while rendering a salute during a freeze mob event April 14, 2015, at Mokapu Mall aboard Marine Corps Base Hawaii. When given the signal, service members froze for three minutes and held up signs containing sexual assault awareness and prevention messages, providing information ranging from statistics to some contributing factors of sexual assault. The goal of the freeze mob event was to grab the attention of bystanders and get them to notice the signs, raising awareness for Sexual Assault Awareness Month, observed in the month of April. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Harley Thomas/Released) - Capt. Penny MacCormack, a supply officer with 3rd Radio Battalion, freezes while rendering a salute during a freeze mob event April 14, 2015, at Mokapu Mall aboard Marine Corps Base Hawaii. When given the signal, service members froze for three minutes and held up signs containing sexual assault awareness and prevention messages, providing information ranging from statistics to some contributing factors of sexual assault. The goal of the freeze mob event was to grab the attention of bystanders and get them to notice the signs, raising awareness for Sexual Assault Awareness Month, observed in the month of April. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Harley Thomas/Released)

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Col. Victor Pastor, Assistant Chief of Staff, G-3/5, 4th Marine Division, discusses force design and establishing a crisis response force Dec. 15, 2021, at Marine Corps Support Facility New Orleans. II MEF and MARFORRES are the Marine Corps’ service-retained forces administratively and operationally controlled by the Marine Corps instead of a combatant command, such as most Marines stationed in California and Japan who are aligned to support U.S. Indo-Pacific Command. The importance of these operational planning teams is to establish the process needed to create an effective service-retained crisis response force to respond to global threats outside of USINDOPACOM area of responsibility. MARFORRES and II MEF are the Marine Corps’ service-retained forces, which means they are administratively and operationally controlled by the Marine Corps. - Col. Victor Pastor, Assistant Chief of Staff, G-3/5, 4th Marine Division, discusses force design and establishing a crisis response force Dec. 15, 2021, at Marine Corps Support Facility New Orleans. II MEF and MARFORRES are the Marine Corps’ service-retained forces administratively and operationally controlled by the Marine Corps instead of a combatant command, such as most Marines stationed in California and Japan who are aligned to support U.S. Indo-Pacific Command. The importance of these operational planning teams is to establish the process needed to create an effective service-retained crisis response force to respond to global threats outside of USINDOPACOM area of responsibility. MARFORRES and II MEF are the Marine Corps’ service-retained forces, which means they are administratively and operationally controlled by the Marine Corps.

Commandant of the Marine Corps, Gen. David H. Berger, and Sergeant Major of the Marine Corps, Sgt. Maj. Troy E. Black, address Marine Corps Recruiting Command leaders at the command’s National Operations and Training Symposium held in San Antonio, Texas, Oct. 20. In addition to discussing the current state of the Corps and the Commandant’s vision for Force Design 2030, Gen. Berger and Sgt. Maj. Black assisted MCRC leadership with presenting Superior Achiever Awards to top performing Recruiting Station Commanders. Superior Achiever awards are presented annually to recognize outstanding leadership, which directly impact recruiting mission success. - Commandant of the Marine Corps, Gen. David H. Berger, and Sergeant Major of the Marine Corps, Sgt. Maj. Troy E. Black, address Marine Corps Recruiting Command leaders at the command’s National Operations and Training Symposium held in San Antonio, Texas, Oct. 20. In addition to discussing the current state of the Corps and the Commandant’s vision for Force Design 2030, Gen. Berger and Sgt. Maj. Black assisted MCRC leadership with presenting Superior Achiever Awards to top performing Recruiting Station Commanders. Superior Achiever awards are presented annually to recognize outstanding leadership, which directly impact recruiting mission success.

U.S. Marine Corps Chief Warrant Officer 4 Benjamin Barron, the chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear defense officer with the 1st Marine Aircraft Wing, Cpl. Dominick Bonner, a CBRN defense specialist, and Gunnery Sgt. Joshua Malchow, the CBRN defense operations coordinator, pose for a group photo on Marine Corps Air Station Futenma, Okinawa, Japan, June 8, 2021. Bonner, a native of Parkville, Maryland, was enjoying breakfast at a restaurant to celebrate his wife’s birthday when he was made aware of a restaurant employee who required medical attention. After entering the kitchen area and locating the man, lying motionless without a pulse, Bonner laid the man on his back and began chest compressions, taking over for a fatigued employee. Bonner continued to provide lifesaving aid for over ten minutes, sustaining the man’s life, until relieved by Japanese paramedics who evacuated the man to a local medical facility. - U.S. Marine Corps Chief Warrant Officer 4 Benjamin Barron, the chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear defense officer with the 1st Marine Aircraft Wing, Cpl. Dominick Bonner, a CBRN defense specialist, and Gunnery Sgt. Joshua Malchow, the CBRN defense operations coordinator, pose for a group photo on Marine Corps Air Station Futenma, Okinawa, Japan, June 8, 2021. Bonner, a native of Parkville, Maryland, was enjoying breakfast at a restaurant to celebrate his wife’s birthday when he was made aware of a restaurant employee who required medical attention. After entering the kitchen area and locating the man, lying motionless without a pulse, Bonner laid the man on his back and began chest compressions, taking over for a fatigued employee. Bonner continued to provide lifesaving aid for over ten minutes, sustaining the man’s life, until relieved by Japanese paramedics who evacuated the man to a local medical facility.

U.S. Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Edgar Wooten (left), basic entryman, and U.S. Marine Corps Sgt. Marcus Edwards (right), team commander, Special Reaction Team, Provost Marshall’s Office, Marine Air Ground Task Force Training Command, practice coordinated movement techniques during an SRT familiarization range at Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center, Twentynine Palms, California, Dec. 11, 2020. SRT Marines are military police officers trained in hostage situation, active shooter and barricaded suspect response. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Joshua Sechser) - U.S. Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Edgar Wooten (left), basic entryman, and U.S. Marine Corps Sgt. Marcus Edwards (right), team commander, Special Reaction Team, Provost Marshall’s Office, Marine Air Ground Task Force Training Command, practice coordinated movement techniques during an SRT familiarization range at Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center, Twentynine Palms, California, Dec. 11, 2020. SRT Marines are military police officers trained in hostage situation, active shooter and barricaded suspect response. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Joshua Sechser)

Marine Corps Base Hawaii