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Photo Information

Australian Army Brig. Gen. Nicholas J. Foxall, the commanding officer of 1st Brigade, and U.S. Marine Corps Maj. Gen. Roger B. Turner, the commanding general of 1st Marine Division, pose for a photo at Robertson Barracks, Darwin, NT, Australia, April 21. The 1st MARDIV commanding general visited Marines and Sailors with Marine Rotational Force-Darwin 22 and members of the Australian Defence Force in Darwin to gain insight into MRF-D 22’s current operations and interoperability.

Photo by Cpl. Cameron Hermanet

The First Marine Division Returns to Australia, as Blue Diamond 6 Visits MRF-D

27 Apr 2022 | Capt. Joseph DiPietro Marine Rotational Force - Darwin

Maj. Gen. Roger Turner, Commanding General of the First Marine Division, visited the Marine Rotational Force-Darwin and the Australian First Brigade on April 21.

“At First Marine Division, we stand on the shoulders of giants, and many of those giants are the Australians and Americans who fought together and won together as part of the Blue Diamond’s success,” said Gen. Turner, who leads the premier warfighting division of the Marine Corps. “5th Marines is progressing MRF-D faster than anyone expected, especially with regard to ‘fight tonight’ capabilities, and now they are featured prominently in the security of the Indo-Pacific.”

“We’re proud to host the Marines in the Northern Territory, and we always look forward to MRF-D and now the Blue Diamond coming back here.” Brig. Nick Foxall, Australia’s First Brigade commander

Australia and the First Marine Division maintain deep roots, notably dating back to operations during World War II. Throughout the Guadalcanal Campaign, Australia provided critical intelligence during the opening days of combat, and continued to provide operational and logistical support across the grueling six month campaign. Following Guadalcanal, Australia hosted the First Marine Division in order to re-arm and re-fit the force. The First Marine Division maintains the Southern Cross as part of its crest, and Waltzing Matilda as the division song, both testaments to the division’s enduring bond with the people of Australia.

“I spent the majority of my career in the Blue Diamond, so to be here in Australia where the division first made its mark on the world is special,” said Master Gunnery Sgt. Robert Robinson, the operations chief for MRF-D 22. “General Turner’s visit was a symbolic event reinforcing the combined history of two great nations and the bond we built over so many years.”

In honor of the storied relationship, Col. Chris Steele, the commanding officer of MRF-D 22, presented tokens to both Gen. Turner and the commander of Australia’s First Brigade, Brigadier Nick Foxall. The tokens featured a boomerang, a symbol commonly found in ADF unit crests, as a representation of unity and brotherhood with MRF-D’s primary Australian partner.

“MRF-D’s recognition of the boomerang is important to us, because one of the most critical parts of a boomerang is the ability to come back,” Brig. Foxall proudly announced to ADF Soldiers and MRF-D Marines. “We’re proud to host the Marines in the Northern Territory, and we always look forward to MRF-D and now the Blue Diamond coming back here.”


Photo Information

Australian Army Brig. Gen. Nicholas J. Foxall, the commanding officer of 1st Brigade, and U.S. Marine Corps Maj. Gen. Roger B. Turner, the commanding general of 1st Marine Division, pose for a photo at Robertson Barracks, Darwin, NT, Australia, April 21. The 1st MARDIV commanding general visited Marines and Sailors with Marine Rotational Force-Darwin 22 and members of the Australian Defence Force in Darwin to gain insight into MRF-D 22’s current operations and interoperability.

Photo by Cpl. Cameron Hermanet

The First Marine Division Returns to Australia, as Blue Diamond 6 Visits MRF-D

27 Apr 2022 | Capt. Joseph DiPietro Marine Rotational Force - Darwin

Maj. Gen. Roger Turner, Commanding General of the First Marine Division, visited the Marine Rotational Force-Darwin and the Australian First Brigade on April 21.

“At First Marine Division, we stand on the shoulders of giants, and many of those giants are the Australians and Americans who fought together and won together as part of the Blue Diamond’s success,” said Gen. Turner, who leads the premier warfighting division of the Marine Corps. “5th Marines is progressing MRF-D faster than anyone expected, especially with regard to ‘fight tonight’ capabilities, and now they are featured prominently in the security of the Indo-Pacific.”

“We’re proud to host the Marines in the Northern Territory, and we always look forward to MRF-D and now the Blue Diamond coming back here.” Brig. Nick Foxall, Australia’s First Brigade commander

Australia and the First Marine Division maintain deep roots, notably dating back to operations during World War II. Throughout the Guadalcanal Campaign, Australia provided critical intelligence during the opening days of combat, and continued to provide operational and logistical support across the grueling six month campaign. Following Guadalcanal, Australia hosted the First Marine Division in order to re-arm and re-fit the force. The First Marine Division maintains the Southern Cross as part of its crest, and Waltzing Matilda as the division song, both testaments to the division’s enduring bond with the people of Australia.

“I spent the majority of my career in the Blue Diamond, so to be here in Australia where the division first made its mark on the world is special,” said Master Gunnery Sgt. Robert Robinson, the operations chief for MRF-D 22. “General Turner’s visit was a symbolic event reinforcing the combined history of two great nations and the bond we built over so many years.”

In honor of the storied relationship, Col. Chris Steele, the commanding officer of MRF-D 22, presented tokens to both Gen. Turner and the commander of Australia’s First Brigade, Brigadier Nick Foxall. The tokens featured a boomerang, a symbol commonly found in ADF unit crests, as a representation of unity and brotherhood with MRF-D’s primary Australian partner.

“MRF-D’s recognition of the boomerang is important to us, because one of the most critical parts of a boomerang is the ability to come back,” Brig. Foxall proudly announced to ADF Soldiers and MRF-D Marines. “We’re proud to host the Marines in the Northern Territory, and we always look forward to MRF-D and now the Blue Diamond coming back here.”


Marine Corps Base Hawaii