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Marine Corps Base Hawaii

"Supporting Readiness and Global Projection"

Marine Aircraft Group 24 set up a combat operations center

By Lance Cpl. Suzanna Knotts | Marine Corps Base Hawaii | May 09, 2014

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Marines with Marine Light Attack Helicopter Squadron 367 begin prepping a UH-1Y Huey helicopter for takeoff as two others prepare to land aboard Marine Corps Air Station Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii, May 6, 2014. Marine Aircraft Group 24 conducted a max launch of 11 total UH-1Y Huey and AH-1W SuperCobra helicopters assigned to HMLA-367 and CH-53E Super Stallion helicopters assigned to Marine Heavy Helicopter Squadron 463 in an effort to increase unit cohesion and camaraderie within the MAG. While HMLA-367 and HMH-463 conducted operations in the air, Marine Wing Support Detachment 24 and Marine Aviation Logistics Squadron 24 were on the ground to provide forward arming and refueling points, giving MAG-24 a chance to work as a whole. After conducting flight operations, the aircraft returned to MCAS Kaneohe Bay and completed their max launch with a flyby over Marine Corps Base Hawaii before landing. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Matthew Bragg)

Marines with Marine Light Attack Helicopter Squadron 367 begin prepping a UH-1Y Huey helicopter for takeoff as two others prepare to land aboard Marine Corps Air Station Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii, May 6, 2014. Marine Aircraft Group 24 conducted a max launch of 11 total UH-1Y Huey and AH-1W SuperCobra helicopters assigned to HMLA-367 and CH-53E Super Stallion helicopters assigned to Marine Heavy Helicopter Squadron 463 in an effort to increase unit cohesion and camaraderie within the MAG. While HMLA-367 and HMH-463 conducted operations in the air, Marine Wing Support Detachment 24 and Marine Aviation Logistics Squadron 24 were on the ground to provide forward arming and refueling points, giving MAG-24 a chance to work as a whole. After conducting flight operations, the aircraft returned to MCAS Kaneohe Bay and completed their max launch with a flyby over Marine Corps Base Hawaii before landing. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Matthew Bragg) (Photo by Lance Cpl. Matthew J. Bragg)


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Marine Corps Base Hawaii --

Marine Aircraft Group 24 set up a combat operations center in conjunction with multiple training exercises next to the MAG-24 headquarters building, May 5, 2014.

A COC is a mobile command and control center designed to support Marines wherever they are deployed and are also utilized during training exercises. The COC is the area of decision making during all phases of ground warfare, allowing Marine forces to digitally collect, process and disseminate data.

Maj. Jeff Marantette, the future operations officer for MAG-24 and native of Saratoga, Calif., said MAG-24 is conducting three large training events, utilizing a COC, May 5 through 9, 2014.

Marantette said they conducted a max launch, fueling arming refueling point training in a joint effort with the Army at Marine Corps Training Area Bellows and tactical recovery of aircraft and personnel training.

A max launch is conducted to have as many available aircraft as possible take off simultaneously, while FARP training focuses on using different fueling systems to refuel multiple aircraft and TRAP training is a search and rescue scenario. 

“We wouldn’t set up the COC if we weren’t doing all this training,” Marantette said. “The COC is the command center for MAG-24’s headquarters, where we process all the information that we receive through the radio, phone and email. It’s the hub of our daily operations.”

Marantette said setting up the COC is training as well. It ensures that radios, computer assets and layout are functional.

“We want to test the set-up and break down of the COC,” Marantette said. “We need to make sure working in this environment is familiar to everyone, and get everyone aware of what their responsibilities are.”

Marantette explained that the COC is also a place for the commanding officer to observe events throughout the day and make decisions based on the commander’s intent.

“The COC is a more efficient way of operation in an austere environment,” Marantette said. “It keeps (a) commander’s situational awareness at a higher level.”

ImageCOC Imagecombat operations cener ImageLance Cpl. Suzanna Knotts

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