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Marine Corps Base Hawaii

"Supporting Readiness and Global Projection"

CLB-3 keeps 2/3 war machine fueled at PTA

By Cpl. Matthew Callahan | Marine Corps Base Hawaii | August 02, 2013

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Marines with Transportation Service Company, Combat Logistics Battalion 3, drive 7-ton vehicles across the barren, volcanic terrain of Pohakuloa Training Area, Hawaii, July 23, 2013. The unit supported 2nd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment during Exercise Lava Viper. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Matthew Callahan)

Marines with Transportation Service Company, Combat Logistics Battalion 3, drive 7-ton vehicles across the barren, volcanic terrain of Pohakuloa Training Area, Hawaii, July 23, 2013. The unit supported 2nd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment during Exercise Lava Viper. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Matthew Callahan) (Photo by Cpl. Matthew Callahan)


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Lance Cpl. Jessica Romero, an Athens, Texas native and engineer with Engineer Service Company, Combat Logistics Battalion 3 moves up the line of advance with a M028 Bangalore torpedo to breach wire obstacles during a live-fire attack at the Infantry Platoon Battle Course, Range 10, Pohakuloa Training Area, July 21, 2013. Romero and her squad mates worked in support of Marines with Golf Company, 2nd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, during Exercise Lava Viper. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Matthew Callahan)

Lance Cpl. Jessica Romero, an Athens, Texas native and engineer with Engineer Service Company, Combat Logistics Battalion 3 moves up the line of advance with a M028 Bangalore torpedo to breach wire obstacles during a live-fire attack at the Infantry Platoon Battle Course, Range 10, Pohakuloa Training Area, July 21, 2013. Romero and her squad mates worked in support of Marines with Golf Company, 2nd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, during Exercise Lava Viper. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Matthew Callahan) (Photo by Cpl. Matthew Callahan)


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Lance Cpl. Garrett Callahan, a Hayward, Calif. native and vehicle commander with Transportation Service Company, Combat Logistics Battalion 3, waits outside of his 7-ton before departing Forward Operating Base 421 in Pohakuloa Training Area, Hawaii, July 23, 2013. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Matthew Callahan)

Lance Cpl. Garrett Callahan, a Hayward, Calif. native and vehicle commander with Transportation Service Company, Combat Logistics Battalion 3, waits outside of his 7-ton before departing Forward Operating Base 421 in Pohakuloa Training Area, Hawaii, July 23, 2013. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Matthew Callahan) (Photo by Cpl. Matthew Callahan)


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Petty Officer 3rd Class Amber Green, a Lebanon, Ind., native with Headquarters and Service Company, Combat Logistics Battalion 3, tests water supplied to Marines with 2nd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, for chlorine and bromine content and alkalinity every day to ensure water remains consistently potable in Pohakuloa Training Area, Hawaii, July 23, 2013. CLB-3 supported 2nd Bn., 3rd Marines during Exercise Lava Viper, a battalion-level combined-arms exercise designed to enhance the capabilities of participating Marines who are part of the ground combat and support element. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Matthew Callahan)

Petty Officer 3rd Class Amber Green, a Lebanon, Ind., native with Headquarters and Service Company, Combat Logistics Battalion 3, tests water supplied to Marines with 2nd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, for chlorine and bromine content and alkalinity every day to ensure water remains consistently potable in Pohakuloa Training Area, Hawaii, July 23, 2013. CLB-3 supported 2nd Bn., 3rd Marines during Exercise Lava Viper, a battalion-level combined-arms exercise designed to enhance the capabilities of participating Marines who are part of the ground combat and support element. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Matthew Callahan) (Photo by Cpl. Matthew Callahan)


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Covers and pre-packaged military rations lay strewn across the dashboard of a 7-ton vehicle. Marines of Combat Logistics Battalion 3 spent long hours driving all across Pohakuloa Training Area, Hawaii in support of 2nd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment for Exercise Lava Viper, July 23, 2013. Lava Viper is a battalion-level combined-arms exercise designed to enhance the capabilities of participating Marines who are part of the ground combat and support element. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Matthew Callahan)

Covers and pre-packaged military rations lay strewn across the dashboard of a 7-ton vehicle. Marines of Combat Logistics Battalion 3 spent long hours driving all across Pohakuloa Training Area, Hawaii in support of 2nd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment for Exercise Lava Viper, July 23, 2013. Lava Viper is a battalion-level combined-arms exercise designed to enhance the capabilities of participating Marines who are part of the ground combat and support element. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Matthew Callahan) (Photo by Cpl. Matthew Callahan)


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Cpl. Cody Walker, a Dinuba, Calif. native and team leader, Engineer Support Company, Combat Logistics Battalion 3 places illumination flares as simulated booby traps for Infantry Marines with 2nd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, to react to during helicopter-borne assaults in Pohakuloa Training Area, Hawaii as part of Exercise Lava Viper, July 23, 2013. “We’re the jack of all trades,” said Walker on the different skills his military occupational specialty employs. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Matthew Callahan)

Cpl. Cody Walker, a Dinuba, Calif. native and team leader, Engineer Support Company, Combat Logistics Battalion 3 places illumination flares as simulated booby traps for Infantry Marines with 2nd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, to react to during helicopter-borne assaults in Pohakuloa Training Area, Hawaii as part of Exercise Lava Viper, July 23, 2013. “We’re the jack of all trades,” said Walker on the different skills his military occupational specialty employs. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Matthew Callahan) (Photo by Cpl. Matthew Callahan)


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POHAKULOA TRAINING AREA, Hawaii -- Warfare is a logistician’s game. The resources necessary to sustain war fighters is immense, requiring a swath of planning and know-how behind the iron curtain of firepower and battlefield prowess Marines are renowned for.
 
There are few things that can slow an infantry battalion down, but faltering in swift and effective resupply of vital resources to keep Marines moving is one of them.

With more than 11,000 hours of driving time, transport of more than 3,200 personnel and 3.4 million pounds of cargo during 147 missions, Marines with Combat Logistics Battalion 3 proved mission accomplishment relies on the intimate and often overlooked relationship infantrymen have with their support element counterparts.

Exercise Lava Viper is a battalion-level combined-arms exercise designed to enhance the skills of participating Marines part of the ground combat and support element.

The “Island Warriors” of 2nd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment relied on a bustling network of Marines in various military occupational specialties in “The Club.” In the field, CLB-3 Marines endeavored to provide food, water, fuel, transportation and combat engineer support to the training infantry Marines.

Wherever the “Island Warriors” needed to go, CLB-3 was on deck to ensure hasty insertion by medium tactical vehicle replacement, often referred to as 7-tons, by Marines. Navy corpsmen with the logistics battalion regularly tested the chemical content of the water supplied in the field, brandishing kits to measure for chlorine, bromine and alkalinity, ensuring water remains consistently potable. The battalion ran fuel trucks across the barren landscape, providing fuel for infantry Marines’ tactical vehicles, saving trips back to the rear and ensuring uninterrupted training.

“Being in PTA, you see the bigger picture,” said Lance Cpl. Christian Sotelo, a 7-ton vehicle commander with Transportation Service Company, CLB-3. “What we do out here, we don’t get to do in the rear. It’s a job and a job that has to get done, and we do it well.”

Some infantrymen may be quick to overlook any MOS that doesn’t start with “03,” but the bigger picture Sotelo referred to is what kept the war machine performing on all cylinders.

Combat engineers with Engineer Service Company, CLB-3 were with the infantrymen every step of the way, embedding within companies to provide breaching knowledge and execution during live-fire attack ranges.

“We’re the jack of all trades,” said Cpl. Cody Walker, a team leader with Engineer Service Co., CLB-3. Walker said training with the infantry “gets us mission effective, just like the grunts. They train for effectiveness, and so do we.”

His team carried M028 Bangalore torpedoes for the wire breaches on the Infantry Platoon Battle Course at Range 10. The course was a 1000-meter rollercoaster ride of rocky terrain.

Engineers moved up the middle of the live-fire attacks with the infantrymen, performing their duties and making the transition from various parts of the battle space seamless for advancing personnel. After a breach, they laid engineer tape onto the deck, guiding Marines, single-file, as they advanced.

“Infantry battalions rely on us to be proficient in our jobs. If we’re not, they become delayed,” said Lance Cpl. Jessica Romero, an engineer with Engineer Service Co., CLB-3. “I never thought I would be working with explosives coming into this job at first. I like what I do and I work hard. As support in CLB-3, I feel we’ve done more than most.”

A Marine infantry battalion is a fierce, high-octane machine, and has proved capable of striking fear into the hearts of generations of enemy combatants over an illustrious history of war fighting. But for all of its might and tactical superiority, the iron curtain becomes an immovable object without the pulley operators — the logisticians.
Image2nd Battalion Image3rd Marine Regiment ImageCLB-3 ImageCombat Logistics Battalion 3 ImageExercise Lava Viper ImagePohakuloa Training Area

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